Blue Willow China: Marks, Patterns & Value Guide (2022)

Towards the end of the 16 century, the trade between the Asians and the Europeans flourished. As this happened, each of these trade partners fell in love with the native goods of their counterparts. One of their biggest interests for the Europeans is hand-painted china.

This hand-painted ceramic kitchenware drew the interest of many people with its elaborate patterns and uniqueness. As such, many English potters decided to learn from the Asians to mass-produce this kitchenware. Along with a long list of failures came some resounding successes, one of which is the Blue Willow China.

Blue Willow China, which depicts an elaborateChinoiserie pattern,isa successful combination of English pottery and Asian motifs. Besides their seemingly mythological origins, many collectors value vintage Blue Willow China and actively search for them. This guide will benefit you If you desire to become a collector or wish to appraise your Blue Willow China.

Table of Contents

History of Blue Willow China

Blue Willow China: Marks, Patterns & Value Guide (1)

Blue Willow China was the creation of English potter Thomas Turner, who sent it into the market in 1779. Although the designs and patterns of this porcelain china seem Asian in origin, it’s English. Of course, the patterns were all influenced by the hand-painted Asian china, which was popular at the time.

Thomas Turner allegedly created the patterns for this china with the aid of his helpers, Thomas Lucas and Thomas Minton. Thomas Minton worked as an engraver, while Thomas Lucas was also a potter. The origin of the blue willow pattern began when these engravers were working with Caughley Salopian China Manufactory.

During this period, they studied the patterns of imported Chinese ceramics and produced landscapes based on the Chinoiserie patterns. They found out that a typical Chinese ceramic usually featured pavilions, boats, birds, and willows. Hence, they incorporated all of these into their designs, which they later used for the Blue Willow China.

After working with Caughley for some time, Thomas Lucas and Thomas Minton resigned from the company. Minton left in 1785 to open his pottery in Stoke-on-Trent, where he worked in producing earthenware. He later started to produce his own Blue Willow China, though, but that was after it surged in popularity.

Lucas, on the other hand, left Caughley to work under Josiah Spode in the Spode pottery. When Thomas Turner was leaving Caughley, he also left with his printer, James Richard. Josiah owned the Spode pottery, which also manufactured Chinese-inspired porcelain works.

Although the exact date for the blue willow china’s creation is unknown, its earliest versions incorporate some Spode pottery designs. As such, many people believe that Thomas Lucas created it in the 1790s while working for Josiah Spode. Of course, the Spode pottery designs are only seen in the earliest versions of Blue Willow china.

(Video) Blue Willow China!

How Was Blue Willow China Manufactured?


Although the Blue Willow China was popular and mass-produced in Europe, its manufacturing process wasn’t easy. It required a lot of criteria and requirements to be in place, such as the usage of spotless white china. After the potter creates the design of the blue willow pattern, they have to engrave it on a copper plate.

The copper plate is then heated up, with ink being applied while it’s hot. However, this is not a one-time process, as the ink is applied and scraped off repeatedly to make it perfect. After which, a piece of paper is applied to the copper plate to transfer the design.

This piece of paper is then put into a press and modified to fit cups, plates, jugs, etc. The transfer is placed on pottery and then ground with a pestle and soft soap to apply the design. The grounding process is done by hand and requires thousands of artisans working together.

Here, the design of Blue Willow China varied, as many manufacturers added more patterns to their designs. Some manufacturers also decided to use more cobalt to create the flow blue look, making it similar to Chinese ceramics.

One of the main determinants of Blue Willow China’s value also began during its manufacturing process. This is because the ones that were created with more precision and care were quite scarce, making them more valuable. The production of Blue Willow China continued from the 18th century to the 19th and 20th centuries.

However, everything changed when war came into the picture. They had to shut the pottery factories down while the potters and engravers were sent to war. Cobalt, which was useful for the war effort, became scarce in the market since the army was monopolizing its usage.

After the end of the war, many pottery factories went out of business, and many skilled potters were also lost. This increased the manufacturing costs and caused many of the blue willow orders to be sent abroad for production. Because of these circumstances, you get Blue Willow China, that’s made in Japan.

Identification of Blue Willow China Markings

Blue Willow China had more than 400 registered potteries manufacturing it at the peak of its popularity. Of course, many unregistered factories produced some knock-offs at the time. All of this culminated in the fact that this porcelain product had varying designs, which were peculiar to its manufacturer.

However, all these china contain some core markings and characteristics that identify them as a genuine blue willow products. Any porcelain china that doesn’t contain these identifying blue willow china markings isn’t a genuine product. These Blue Willow China identification markings include:

  • Two birds that are in flight
  • Three figures on a bridge
  • A pagoda
  • A latticework fence
  • A boat or a ship
  • Willow trees
  • Chinese pine trees

Blue Willow China: Marks, Patterns & Value Guide (2)

Blue Willow China markings, culled from Adirondack Girl @ Heart

All these identifying characteristics are from the Blue Willow China legend. Like most others in history, this legend is fake and was developed to boost Thomas Minton’s sales in this china. The legend was based on ‘The Green Willow,’ a popular Japanese fairy tale, and also incorporates other Asian fairy tales.

Legend of the Blue Willow

In this legend, there lived a rich Mandarin (a wealthy duke) who had a daughter, Koong-se. This wealthy duke had an assistant, Chang, who was assisting him with his accounting. The duke’s daughter fell in love with the humble accounting assistant, Chang.

However, such love was never meant to be since they were both of different statuses. The revelation of this feeling angered the duke to the point that he dismissed the accountant from his job. He also made more plans to keep these lovers apart as he built a fence around the house.

While he did this, the duke arranged for his daughter to marry another duke. That duke sailed in on a boat to take his new bride, bringing a jewelry box as a gift. They planned the arranged marriage for that day on which the blossoms fall from the willow tree.

However, that young Chang never gave up on Koong-se, and he entered the duke’s house on the wedding eve. Disguised as a servant, Chang rescued his lover, and they both escaped with the jewelry box. The duke was furious when he learned of this, and he pursued them with a whip over a bridge.

The lovers eventually escaped the duke’s capture and sailed away on one of the duke’s ships. They stopped at an island, where they lived in happiness for many years. However, this happiness wasn’t going to last for long.

(Video) Collecting 101: Flow Blue China! The History, Popular Patterns & Value! Episode 18

The duke eventually learned of their location and sent his soldiers after them. With his permission, the soldiers captured the eloped lovers and put Chang to death. The death of her lover caused Koong-se to lose interest in leaving; as such, she later died of grief.

The gods saw the plight of these lovers and pitied them. They transformed the lovers into a pair of doves so that they could fly away and be together once again.

How to Identify Genuine Blue Willow China

Although Blue Willow China had various manufacturers, many of whom altered the blue willow pattern, knock-offs were still present. These knock-offs were poor-quality products, which undermined the authenticity of genuine rare blue willow china.

With so many genuine patterns available, utilizing only the identifying blue willow china markings makes it impossible to spot fakes. As such, there are other factors that you can consider to ascertain the authenticity of your china. You can also use these methods to help determine your blue willow china value, and they include:

Transferware Patterns

Just as was explained above, Blue Willow China is the result of transferring a blue willow pattern to china. As such, the blue willow itself is a transferware pattern placed on various pieces of china.

This process isn’t perfect like most transferware patterns, so you’ll probably see some imperfect sections. This includes areas where the motifs don’t join properly or where the transfer pattern is a little crinkled. So, there are chances that authentic blue willow china would have some imperfect transferware patterns.

Determine the Date of the Blue Willow China

Professional blue willow collectors proposed a few methods that can clue you into the date of your piece. These methods help you determine if you’re looking at rare blue willow china or a modern recreation, and they include:

  • The Buffalo Pottery Company issued the blue willow pattern after 1905. As such, it was after that period that American potteries started producing blue willow pieces. So, if you see a piece that’s marked by American potteries, you can infer that it was produced after 1905.
  • The production process of the pioneer blue willow pieces caused them to have a lighter glaze. After such a long period, these pieces are expected to have shown signs of cracking along their glaze. So, seeing such signs on a blue willow piece would tell you that it was probably an early piece.
  • Marked blue willow china pieces offer a general idea about their age. This is because the companies that produced them only did so for a short period.
  • Unmarked blue willow china is usually a modern production, or they can also say ‘made in China.

Popular Manufacturers of Blue Willow China

Popular manufacturers of blue willow china have always left their mark on the product. This made it easier for their products to be recognized, and some of these popular manufacturers include:

Churchill England Blue Willow China

Blue Willow China: Marks, Patterns & Value Guide (3)

Vintage Churchill England jug with identifying markings underneath culled from Adirondack Girl @ Heart.

Blue Willow China: Marks, Patterns & Value Guide (4)

A Churchill England mug with identifying markings under it culled from Adirondack Girl @ Heart.

Churchill China is one of the many companies that started manufacturing their blue willow china when its popularity surged. This England-based company began its production in 1795. As such, products marked with their name were produced from 1795 well into the 1800s.

A Churchill England blue willow is known for using copper engraved printing, one of the oldest printing methods. This process was so complex that a skilled craftsman could require six months just to engrave one plate. Hence, vintage Churchill blue willow china’s value is very high, with a teapot going for close to $900.

The earthenware used for this process is also durable, allowing it to withstand various kitchen accidents. An underglaze printing is also applied to the bottom of such kitchenware to make them scratch resistant. This meticulous process caused Churchill England’s blue willow china’s value to be higher than most contemporaries.

Buffalo Pottery Blue Willow China

Buffalo Pottery is an American company, and they are the first American company to produce blue willow china. Their capability in blue willow printing is so high that they matched the English in its mastery.

Blue Willow China: Marks, Patterns & Value Guide (5)

(Video) Japan Back Stamp

Buffalo Pottery china, produced in 1949, culled from Adirondack Girl @ Heart.

Buffalo Pottery products can be identified by their name written underneath them. Underneath their name is a set of codes that indicate the year and month of production. You can identify them using the information from Restaurant Ware Collectors Network; accordingly, the one above was made in 1949.

Blue Willow China Made in Japan

Blue Willow China: Marks, Patterns & Value Guide (6)

Made in Japan, blue willow teapot and saucer, called from Adirondack Girl @ Heart

Blue Willow China: Marks, Patterns & Value Guide (7)

Made in Japan, blue willow china, culled from Adirondack Girl @ Heart

Since the end of the war, many blue willow orders were exported to China. While many of them were produced as they should, others had alterations made to them. This is where most ‘Made in Japan’ pieces are made from.

Johnson Brothers Blue Willow China

Blue Willow China: Marks, Patterns & Value Guide (8)

Johnson Brothers china culled from Vintage Farmhouse Antiques.

The Johnson Brother is a pottery company that is based in England. Their dishware was produced in England until the Wedgewood Group purchased the company in 2003. When the Wedgewood Group purchased this company, they produced their earthenware in China, as they believed that it reduced costs.

Blue Willow China: Marks, Patterns & Value Guide (9)

Engraving under Johnson Brothers china culled from Vintage Farmhouse Antiques.

However, most antique Johnson Brothers blue willow china would indicate their country and date of production under it.

Important Things to Note about Blue Willow China

If you have decided to collect blue willow china, there are some important things to note about them:

They’re Not All Blue

Blue Willow China: Marks, Patterns & Value Guide (10)

Pink Coloured blue willow china, culled from Simplemost.

Although the name is Blue Willow China, not all pieces of this product are blue in color. Sure, the pioneer and classic versions are all cast in blue; later ones are multicolored. So, you’ll probably see pink china with the blue willow pattern, green, etc.

(Video) Exploring the Blue Willow Pattern - What does British Tableware have to do with the Opium Wars?

Brand New Blue Willow China Is Available

Although the blue willow pattern is probably ancient by now, many people still love it. As such, many of the companies that are involved in the antique versions still make new ones. So, you’ll still see the new Johnson Brothers blue willow china, Buffalo Pottery china, Churchill China, etc.

Of course, the antique versions are still worth more. However, the newer versions are more visually appealing since they’re made with high-tech machinery.

Blue Willow China Has a Dedicated Following

International Willow Collectorsis an organization that was formed to bring people of equal interests together – collectors of blue willow. This organization is made of people who are well versed in blue willow pottery. So, it’s best to join them if you want to go full-time to collect such pottery pieces.

How Much Is Blue Willow China Worth

Blue Willow China is worth a lot of money as a piece of porcelain art and dinnerware. However, the blue willow china value is higher when the piece is undamaged and in mint condition.

Most people are willing to pay more if it’s antique English blue willow, which was made in the 1800s. Unmarked blue willow china, American pieces, and the Japanese-made versions are not worth much since they’re mass-produced. Hence, a good Churchill blue willow (an English piece) can be worth up to $1000.

Kitchenware like coffee pots and platters are worth more than items like coffee cups. This is because the former is unique and hard to find compared to the latter. As such, rare pieces like coffee pots can go for $650, while easily found coffee cup sets go for $30.

You’ll also spend more if you’re looking for a complete set of kitchenware. This includes a coffee pot, coffee cup, and platter from the same manufacturer and the same year of production.

Some recent Blue Willow China that was sold on eBay in 2022 include:

How to Determine Your Blue Willow China’s Value

Do you have some antique blue willow china that you want to get off your hands? Or do you have a blue willow family heirloom that you would like to know its value? Well, there are many ways to determine the value of your blue willow china, and they include:

Getting Them Appraised

The best method of knowing how much your blue willow piece is worth is having a professional take a look. Blue Willow china has a lot of pieces from a lot of manufacturers, which leads to a lot of variations. Going through these to determine its value is cumbersome and could be handled by a professional appraiser to avoid errors.

Identifying Marks

Some blue willow pieces are worth more than others, and that’s a fact. It was established above that English pieces are worth the most, followed by the American pieces.

Hence, if you want to know how much your blue willow piece is worth, you can look for identifying marks. This will tell you if a piece is English, American, Japanese, or unmarked, cluing you on how much it’s worth.

Recent Sales of Similar Pieces

You can determine the value of your blue willow china by checking up on how much its contemporaries were sold. If you go to websites like eBay, you can check their completed sale section for this. This would tell you how much other individuals would value your piece.

The Condition of the Blue Willow Piece

Mint and unused blue willow pieces are always valued more than others. If your porcelain china is unmarked by the passage of time, it will get sold for a pretty penny. This doesn’t mean that chipped pieces cannot be bought; instead, they’ll be priced much lower.

Places to Purchase Rare Blue Willow China

You can visit a few shops if you’re interested in acquiring rare blue willow china. While there is no certainty that you’ll find one, there are chances that you might. Some of these platforms include:

  • The Vermont Country Store: The Vermont Country Store is a good location to look for antique blue willow china. However, they mostly carry Churchill China of England products.
  • eBay: eBay is an online marketplace from where you might be lucky to spot genuine blue willow china. Some of these pieces can appear as auctions or ‘buy it now’ pieces. So, you just need to be on the lookout for one, and you could get lucky.
  • Chairish: This is another online platform where you can find blue willow pieces.
  • Ruby Lane: Ruby Lane is an online platform where you can purchase or sell your blue willow pottery.
  • Etsy: Etsy is an online platform that provides an opportunity to get blue willow china from someone that’s selling it.
  • Vintage Farmhouse Antiques: This online platform keeps a wide variety of blue willow pottery.
  • Besides these online platforms, you can also find some blue willow pieces in country stores or yard sales. So, as you are searching online, don’t forget to consider offline stores as well.

Conclusion

Blue Willow China began as a successful representation of what an English man believes Asian pottery is like. This representation picked up steam when many Europeans, who were hungry for Asian pottery, loved it. From that point onward, this transferware pattern left its mark in the annals of history.

Although war halted the production of genuine pieces, there are still many that are out there. With the guide above, you can quickly determine the Genuity of your blue willow piece. This guide would also provide you with useful shops to curate a good collection of blue willow china.

(Video) BLUE WILLOW CHINA

FAQs

What is my Blue Willow china worth? ›

Authentic Blue Willow china from the 1700s can be worth up to $5,000. Inexpensive pieces or pieces that have been made more recently are usually worth under $200. Today, Blue Willow dishware is most commonly sold for a few hundred dollars, but you can still hunt down the more valuable dish pieces.

Which willow pattern is valuable? ›

Experts agree that English Willow is usually a better investment than Japanese or American, because it's older and of higher quality. Anything between 1780 and 1820 is rare; plates can sell for $100 to $200 apiece, while more unusual pieces can go for up to $5,000, says Berndt.

What is a set of Blue Willow dishes worth? ›

Prices on Blue Willow vary from high to low ($10 to $1000+), with older English pieces bringing the highest values and newer American or Japanese pieces bringing the lowest.

How do you date a Blue Willow? ›

Look for Clues About the Date

Early Blue Willow pieces have a softer glaze and a lighter overall feel. Older pieces may have some signs of crazing or light cracking on the surface of the glaze. Some marked pieces offer clues because the mark was only used for a certain period of time at that pottery.

How old is the Blue Willow pattern? ›

1. Blue Willow china originated in England. Even though the Blue Willow pattern has a Chinese look and story (more on that later), it was actually created in England in 1780 by engraver Thomas Minton.

What is the most valuable blue and white china? ›

The Most Expensive Porcelain

In 12 July, 2005, an exceptionally rare and specially-themed blue and white Yuan era jar was sold for £15.7 million at Christie's in London. It became the most expensive Asian work of art.

How can we identify the flow of blue china? ›

Flow blue is a blue and white china pattern, but it differs from traditional Blue Willow and other crisp transferware designs. Instead, the blue design is intentionally a bit blurred, an effect that results from adding lime to the kiln as the piece was being fired.

Was Blue Willow made in Japan? ›

Blue Willow (Made In Japan)

Does Blue Willow china have lead in it? ›

Question: Are Blue Willow Dishes Lead Free? Answer: Um, no. In fact most of them have incredibly high levels of lead (in a range that I would consider as not safe to eat off of.)

How do I know if my dishes are worth anything? ›

Look for a back stamp or marker stamp.

This is the easiest way to identify the manufacturer of your dinnerware, although in many cases the stamps may have faded or become illegible. Once you know the manufacturer, you can look up the approximate value of the piece online.

Can you put Blue Willow china in the dishwasher? ›

It is heavy enough to be durable for everyday use (microwave and dishwasher safe), but as pretty as many of the fine china versions. All the elements of traditional blue willow china are here without any fuzzy, chopped up, uneven, or cartoonish features.

When was the willow pattern made? ›

Willow pattern, landscape design developed by Thomas Turner at Caughley, Shropshire, Eng., in 1779 in imitation of the Chinese.

Is Willow Ware valuable? ›

The great production of Blue Willow in the past 2½ centuries means a great deal of variety in values. Eighteenth and 19th century porcelain examples can command prices into the thousands, and even some 20th century transferware pieces are highly collectible.

What is the Willow Pattern story? ›

The Willow Pattern Story

The story tells how Koong-se, the beautiful daughter of a wealthy Mandarin, fell in love with Chang, his low-born assistant. When the Mandarin found out he banished Chang and built a great fence around his property to keep his daughter in and Chang out.

What is the name of blue and white china? ›

Blue and white porcelain

Is Blue Willow Delftware? ›

Delftware vs. Blue Willow | How to Identify Vintage Ceramics and Why ...

What china patterns are worth money? ›

Clockwise from top left: Franciscan Desert Rose, Royal Copenhagen Flora Danica, Spode Christmas Tree and Noritake Royal Orchard are china patterns that could fetch you some good money.

How do I know if my china is worth anything? ›

Look on the bottom of saucers, dishes and cups for hallmarks or monograms. Just because ceramic china dinnerware looks old, it doesn't mean that it's valuable. Spider cracks in glaze coats can happen during the firing process and not just come from age, which makes spidering a questionable identification technique.

What is the most valuable vintage china? ›

15 Most Expensive Antique Dishes
No.Antique Dish BrandValue
1Qing Dynasty Porcelain$84 million
2Blue & White Porcelain$21.6 million
3Blood Red Porcelain$9.5 million
4Joseon Baekje Porcelain$4.2 million
11 more rows

Is flow blue china worth anything? ›

Flow Blue can be found for as little as $35.00 on up to $500.00, depending on condition, style, type, age, and market demand. Some of the oldest pieces may be extremely valuable or museum quality.

What is antique flow blue? ›

Flow blue (occasionally 'flown blue') is a style of white earthenware, sometimes porcelain, that originated in the Regency era, sometime in the 1820s, among the Staffordshire potters of England. The name is derived from the blue glaze that blurred or "flowed" during the firing process.

Is vintage china worth anything? ›

If the china is modern or hard-paste, then it's not usually worth much unless it's rare or collectible. If your china is bone china and very old or rare, then it may be worth a fortune!

Is Churchill China good? ›

The Churchill brand is globally recognised andwe have a solid reputation as a manufacturer of the highest quality ceramic products.

What is Blue Danube China? ›

Blue Danube, a Lipper International pattern introduced in 1951, was inspired by Chinese design created in the Yuan dynasty (A.D. 1260 to 1368). Its stylized flowers are ancient Chinese symbols for good fortune and happiness.

What is Blue Onion china? ›

Blue Onion (German: Zwiebelmuster) is a porcelain tableware pattern for dishware originally manufactured by Meissen porcelain since the 18th century, and since the last 19th Century has been copied by other companies.

How do you test for vintage lead in china? ›

Test the pottery. Consumers can buy lead-testing kits in hardware stores or online. The kits contain swabs with instructions on proper use of the swabs and reading of the results. In most cases, the consumer will rub the swab on the food-contacting surface of the pottery.

When did they stop using lead in china dishes? ›

If you are using dinnerware manufactured prior to 1971 or manufactured in another country, be sure there are no cracks, chips or damage to the glaze finish where lead can leach out, and look for a label that says it is safe for food use.

How do I identify my china pattern? ›

The Backstamp

Backstamps provide a clue as to the date of china, because historically, manufacturers changed stamps frequently. Using a magnifying glass, you can see the writing on the mark.

What is considered vintage china? ›

Vintage: An item that is not yet 100 years old, but widely recognizable as being from a specific period time. A vintage items should speak to the era from which it came, but anything less than 20 years old should never be referred to as vintage.

How do you identify vintage dishes? ›

The markings on the underside of antique dishes can often help you to identify more than who made the piece. Some dishes have a stamp telling you the name of the manufacturer and also a date mark. These marks give you the approximate time frame during which your antique dish was made.

What does Transferware mean? ›

Transferware is the term given to pottery that has had a pattern applied by transferring the print from a copper plate to a specially sized paper and finally to the pottery body. While produced primarily on earthenware, transfer prints are also found on ironstone, porcelain and bone china.

Does my china contain lead? ›

If your china is highly decorated or multicolored, there is a better chance that it contains lead glazing or decorations using lead. And those pieces of china with decorations atop the glaze rather than beneath the glaze may contain lead.

Is Willow pattern Japanese or Chinese? ›

The story is based on the Japanese fairy tale "The Green Willow" and other ancient fairy tales originating in China about the constellations that tell the story of two lovers separated and envied by gods for their love. The lovers can only meet once a year when the stars align.

When was Churchill Blue Willow made? ›

Product Description. Beautiful English China by Churchill Very popular Blue Willow Pattern, Made in England 1989-2006, currently discontinued.

How do you read Chinese porcelain marks? ›

According to the ancient Chinese tradition of writing and reading, the marks on the bottom of a porcelain vessel are usually read from top to bottom, and from right to left. Marks written horizontally are read from right to left.

Which Chinese dynasty is known for its blue and white porcelain? ›

You are in the China section

The Ming Dynasty (1368–1644) is famed for its blue and white porcelain.

What is the blue Chinese pottery called? ›

The Samarra Blue (sumali qing) or Sumatra Blue (suboni qing) cobalt used for Yuan wares was rich in iron, which yielded a glaze with darker blue spots. This so-called 'heaped and piled' effect was caused by the accumulation of iron oxide in the cobalt pigment in certain areas of the surface.

How do I know if my dishes are worth anything? ›

Look for a back stamp or marker stamp.

This is the easiest way to identify the manufacturer of your dinnerware, although in many cases the stamps may have faded or become illegible. Once you know the manufacturer, you can look up the approximate value of the piece online.

What is the name of blue and white china? ›

Blue and white porcelain

Is Churchill China good? ›

The Churchill brand is globally recognised andwe have a solid reputation as a manufacturer of the highest quality ceramic products.

What is the story behind the Blue Willow china? ›

The Willow Pattern was a blue and white transfer-printed composite design which brought together Buddhist imagery, pagodas, landscapes, birds and trees from Chinese porcelain. The pattern is said to be woven around a romantic story of star-crossed lovers eloping together.

How do I identify my china pattern? ›

The Backstamp

Backstamps provide a clue as to the date of china, because historically, manufacturers changed stamps frequently. Using a magnifying glass, you can see the writing on the mark.

What china dishes are worth money? ›

15 Most Expensive Antique Dishes
No.Antique Dish BrandValue
1Qing Dynasty Porcelain$84 million
2Blue & White Porcelain$21.6 million
3Blood Red Porcelain$9.5 million
4Joseon Baekje Porcelain$4.2 million
11 more rows

How do I know if my china is valuable? ›

Look on the bottom of saucers, dishes and cups for hallmarks or monograms. Just because ceramic china dinnerware looks old, it doesn't mean that it's valuable. Spider cracks in glaze coats can happen during the firing process and not just come from age, which makes spidering a questionable identification technique.

What is the most sought after china? ›

Blue Willow is arguably the most collectible – but it's also one of the most widely produced. Even today, companies are creating Blue Willow patterned china. The rare, original, and very old Blue Willow china pieces are the most collectible and the most valuable, if you can get your hands on them.

How can we identify the flow of blue china? ›

Flow blue is a blue and white china pattern, but it differs from traditional Blue Willow and other crisp transferware designs. Instead, the blue design is intentionally a bit blurred, an effect that results from adding lime to the kiln as the piece was being fired.

How do you read Chinese porcelain marks? ›

According to the ancient Chinese tradition of writing and reading, the marks on the bottom of a porcelain vessel are usually read from top to bottom, and from right to left. Marks written horizontally are read from right to left.

Is Churchill China still made in England? ›

Churchill China PLC (LSE: CHH) is a British pottery manufacturer based in Stoke-on-Trent in the United Kingdom.
...
Churchill China.
TypePublic Limited Company
Founded1795
HeadquartersSandyford, Stoke-on-Trent , England
Websitehttp://www.churchill1795.com/
2 more rows

Is Churchill China bone china? ›

The Churchill pottery range is made up of fine earthenware and bone china products that provide a reliable and beautiful solution to any dining table. With over 200 years of manufacturing expertise, Churchill has become an exceedingly popular brand catering towards traditional, modern and contemporary homes.

Who makes Churchill China? ›

The Roper family still hold a significant share of the business, ensuring the traditional values of the company remain upheld. The company's presence on the London Stock Exchange in 1994 has proved the longevity of the Churchill brand and has given it recognition as a substantial, global organisation.

Does Blue Willow china have lead in it? ›

Question: Are Blue Willow Dishes Lead Free? Answer: Um, no. In fact most of them have incredibly high levels of lead (in a range that I would consider as not safe to eat off of.)

What is in a willow pattern? ›

Willow Pattern has set characteristics. It features a pagoda structure, three figures on a bridge, a figure on a boat, two flying birds and, of course, a weeping willow tree.

Is Willow pattern Japanese or Chinese? ›

The story is based on the Japanese fairy tale "The Green Willow" and other ancient fairy tales originating in China about the constellations that tell the story of two lovers separated and envied by gods for their love. The lovers can only meet once a year when the stars align.

If so then you’re going to enjoy today’s post all about collecting vintage blue willow china, one of the most popular china patterns in the world.. Credit for the Blue Willow story goes to Minton, another English pottery.. Once upon a time, Koong-se a young woman of great beauty fell in love with Chang, her father’s accountant.. And in fact the Royal China Company out of Ohio produced a set of Blue Willow china that grocery stores gave away in the 1940’s, long before Churchill China ever got into the act.. So much Blue Willow china has been produced over the years that you can literally find it everywhere (!).

The two lovers are forbidden to be together because of their social status; this story has commonly been depicted on china dishware.. Authentic Blue Willow china from the 1700s can be worth up to $5,000.. The Blue Willow pattern’s story. Blue Willow china is valuable according to its authenticity.. When collectors look for blue willow china, they want to find rare pieces and sets that are English-made and come from before 1820, so ideally made somewhere in between 1780-1820.. Which blue willow china pieces are the most valuable?. If you’re looking to sell your blue willow china, in order to have an accurate idea of how much you can sell it for, you need to verify its authenticity.. English-made blue willow china is worth the most.. How much is a blue willow plate worth?. The only blue willow plates that are worth selling are English-made plates.. Valuable blue china patterns. Adams, Doulton (1890-1910) Scinde pattern by John & George Alcock (1840) Cashmere pattern by Ridgway & Francis Morley (1850-1860) Amerillia pattern by Podmore, Walker & Co. (1850) [Source]

A few additional photos and marks.. If you own the book and want a corrected copy, a list of additions and corrections can be found at the end of this list of books for willow collectors.. Willow!. All pieces on the page are porcelain. p. 97.. The mark at the bottom of p. 146 is not a WEDGWOOD mark.. Photo has Mark 2 –not Mark 1.. No mark is given.. Correct dates for Mark 4: 1928-29 – not 1828.

As one of the most renowned and fascinating of romantic fables, with its Shakespearean overtones of doomed love and tragedy, the Willow Pattern story is universally familiar.. This instantly recognisable pattern is a classic Chinese landscape design, the fundamentals of which include a weeping willow, pagodas, a crooked fence, a tree bearing fruit, three or four figures on a bridge, a boat and a pair of lovebirds forever kissing.. He surrounded the palace grounds with a crooked fence and, against her wishes, arranged for Knoon-se to marry the warrior Duke Ta-jin.. [Here, versions of the legend differ; as some say that] Chang sent a message to his beloved by fixing a sail to a shell and floating it down the river bearing a love poem, “ As this boat sails to thee, so my thoughts tend “, which Knoon-se scooped from the river with her parasol.. At the dead of night, murderous men surrounded the pagoda, setting it alight as Knoon-se and Chang slept.. The Legend of the Willow Pattern – as we know it – may have little substance as an ancient Chinese fable.. Intellectuals would meet for discussions over a cup of tea and high society followed, adopting elaborate social rituals of tea drinking with attendant paraphernalia and affectation.. Caughley Nankin Willow plate c.1870 and Spode Willow Pattern plateThere is apparently no Chinese design which contains all the features of the standard Willow Pattern; and it is also interesting to note that some early British versions of Chinese ceramic art were reproduced in pastel blues on white, as designers believed these pallid hues were the original colour scheme.. These shards depicted typical pagodas, trees and other elements of the [later] Willow Pattern, – adding substance to the claim that Josiah Spode borrowed features from not only “Mandarin” but “Forest Landscape” and other available Canton ware to create this unique panorama.. A century or so later Carlton Ware produced the first of its known WILLOW designs; a delightful Flow Blue version shown here on a small vessel.. Carlton Ware WILLOW on white, orange lustre and pale blue lustrePair of Crown Devon Lustrine Willow Pattern bowls and Chinese Panel vaseThroughout half a century, Carlton Ware variously incorporated rudiments of the Willow Pattern into specific designs such as “ MIKADO ” and “ NEW MIKADO “, “ TEMPLE “, “ BARGE “, “ CHINESE TEA GARDEN “, “ CHINESE FIGURES ” and “ Mandarins Chatting “; for example “ MIKADO ” invariably includes a pair of kissing birds.. Carlton Ware WILLOW 1950’s ginger jar in green and blue on whiteReflecting the optimism of a new century, potteries such as Carlton Ware, Crown Devon and Wedgwood enhanced this time-honoured landscape with an up-to-date flamboyance, celebrating the historic Willow Pattern whilst respectfully preserving its spirit or chi.. Carlton Ware MIKADO spill vase, Carlton Ware Flow Blue WILLOW vessel Crown Devon Pagoda vase & Carlton Ware WILLOW jug

What is willow?. Where did the willow pattern come from?. How do I know if my willow is old or new?. There are some new Chinese unmarked pieces that can. look exactly like the older pieces.. Some collectors specialize in one certain type of willow, say. cups and saucers; some people collect the newer China pieces,. some collect anything and everything.. Take a glance in some. of the willow books or get on the Internet and see if the patterns. you have are willow.. Use the book’s prices as a rough estimate on what. might be more collectible.

Because Blue Willow China has been produced by so many companies over the years, it can be difficult to identify which pieces are considered Churchill Blue Willow.. While Blue Willow china was originally produced in the 1780s, ChurchillBlue Willow china was first made in 1818 by Sampson Bridgwood.. Like many other vintage pieces, Churchill Blue Willow china has a unique history.. Blue Willow china pieces, including Churchill Blue Willow items, feature traditional Chinese scenes telling various stories.. You may see various parts of this story on your Churchill Blue Willow pieces.. Although Blue Willow patterned china was made all over the world, Churchill Blue Willow pieces were all manufactured in England.. The history of Churchill Blue Willow is a bit complicated, as it actually ran under the name of Samuel Bridgwood & Sons when it was originally produced in 1818, and it wasn’t even produced under the Churchill name until the 1990s.. While Churchill China company originally produced its Blue Willow pieces in England, today the company has expanded to have several showrooms.. This professional can give you an accurate idea of what your Churchill Blue Willow china piece is worth.. Many of the original Churchill Blue Willow china pieces do contain lead.

It would be almost impossible to make a complete list of products with this pattern, as there are even manufacturers of paper products who have placed the Blue Willow pattern willow blue english china pattern their products.. The Pattern's Features The Blue Willow pattern has many classic features, including a distinctly that always shows a pagoda or a teahouse, an Oriental bridge with three crossing it, willow blue english china pattern zigzagging fence made of latticework, a willow tree, and two birds in flight.. There will be similarities, and there will also be replications; because of its popularity, Blue Willow has been imitated, so it is important to make sure you are getting true Blue Willow china.. Determining Age and Manufacturer of Blue Willow China One of the only ways to determine who willow blue english china pattern the piece and how old it is will be to look for the mark on the bottom.. Traditional Blue Willow sets will usually only place the mark on plates; the cups and other items in the set will only include willow blue english china pattern country of origin.. Patterns Used While it is true that every piece of Blue Willow china has certain universal features that will appear in every variation of the pattern, there are different types of this pattern to look for as well.. What to Look for in Blue Willow When searching for Blue Willow china to add to your collection or to or findit is important to ensure the piece is not broken.. Many people cringe when they consider using their Blue Willow china or any other china that is a collector's item.

Do you have an antiquer china piece or set at home?. Image credit: scullyandscully.com Froda Danica is one of the most valuable china patterns .. Image credit: scullyandscully.com Meissen’s Ming Dragon Red pattern is more on the affordable side of valuable antiques but it still frequently sells for anywhere between a few hundred and several thousand dollars, depending on the condition and age.. Image credit: wayfair.com Lenox makes new holiday-themed plates and sets almost every year and they typically sell for a few hundred dollars per set.. The latter is typically mostly white so this is a simple way to make sure you have actual china on your hands.. This isn’t a surefire method as the design, coating, edging, and exact materials of each china piece can vary.. Many manufacturers have specific types and patterns of edging that can serve as an extra identification method.. This method takes time as the auction house will do its best to find the best possible price for your set.. The main thing that sets bone china and both types of porcelain china apart is the materials used.. Soft-paste porcelain china , on the other hand, doesn’t use kaolin clay.. As for whether you’re dealing with ordinary porcelain or actual china, remember that the difference there isn’t so much in the materials used but the temperature at which they’ve been hardened.

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