20 best German foods (2022)

(CNN) — German food is rich, hearty and diverse. It's comfort eating with high-quality, often locally sourced ingredients.

The cuisine of Germany has been shaped not only by the country's agricultural traditions but by the many immigrants that have made the country home over the centuries.

It's definitely more than a mere mix of beer, sauerkraut and sausage.

Today Germans appreciate well-prepared, well-served meals as much as they do a quick bite on the go. This is a country of food markets, beer gardens, wine festivals, food museums and high-end restaurants.

So: Haben sie hunger? Are you hungry now? Check out our list of 20 traditional German dishes that you need to try when you travel there.

1. Königsberger klopse

Named after the former East Prussian capital of Königsberg (now Kaliningrad in Russia), this tasty dish of meatballs in a creamy white sauce with capers is beloved by grandmothers and chefs alike.

The meatballs are traditionally made with minced veal, onion, eggs, anchovies, pepper and other spices. The sauce's capers and lemon juice give this filling comfort food a surprisingly elegant finish.

In the German Democratic Republic, officials renamed the dish kochklopse (boiled meatballs) to avoid any reference to its namesake, which had been annexed by the Soviet Union. Today it's possible to find königsberger klopse under their traditional name in most German restaurants, but they are especially popular in Berlin and Brandenburg.

2. Maultaschen

Maultaschen is especially popular in southern Germany.

Katharina Hild/imageBROKER/Shutterstock

Maultaschen from Swabia are a lot like ravioli but bigger. They are typically palm-sized, square pockets of dough with fillings that run the gamut from savory to sweet and meaty to vegetarian.

A traditional combination is minced meat, bread crumbs, onions and spinach -- all seasoned with salt, pepper and parsley. They're often simmered and served with broth instead of sauce for a tender, creamier treat, but are sometimes pan-fried and buttered for extra richness.

Today you can find maultaschen all over Germany (even frozen in supermarkets) but they're most common in the south.

Here the delicious dumplings have become so important that in 2009, the European Union recognized Maultaschen as a regional specialty and marked the dish as significant to the cultural heritage of the state of Baden-Württemberg.

3. Labskaus

Labskaus is not the most visually appealing dish, but a delectable mess that represents the seafaring traditions of northern Germany like no other. In the 18th and 19th centuries, ship provisions were mostly preserved fare, and the pink slop of labskaus was a delicious way of preparing them.

Salted beef, onions, potatoes and pickled beetroot are all mashed up like porridge and served with pickled gherkins and rollmops (see below). It has long been a favorite of Baltic and North Sea sailors.

Today the dish is served all over northern Germany, but especially in Bremen, Kiel and Hamburg. And while on modern ships fridges have been installed, it remains popular as a hangover cure.

4. Sausages

Of course sausages make the cut!

Bodo Schieren/imageBROKER/Shutterstock/Shutterstock

There is no Germany without sausages.

(Video) Must Eat German Food | The Ultimate German Food Tour

There are countless cured, smoked and other varieties available across wurst-loving Germany, so, for this list we will focus on some of the best German street food: bratwurst, or fried sausages.

There are more than 40 varieties of German bratwurst. Fried on a barbecue or in the pan, and then served in a white bread roll with mustard on the go, or with potato salad or sauerkraut as the perfect accompaniment for German beer.

Some of the most common bratwurst are:

-- Fränkische bratwurst from Fraconia with marjoram as a characteristic ingredient.

-- Nürnberger rostbratwurst that is small in size and mostly comes from the grill.

-- Thüringer rostbratwurst from Thuringia, which is quite spicy. Thuringia is also the home of the first German bratwurst museum, which opened in 2006.

The most popular incarnation of bratwurst, however, is the next item on our list.

Related content

Inside Germany's sausage hotel

5. Currywurst

Practically synonymous with German cuisine since 1945, currywurst is commonly attributed to Herta Heuwer, a Berlin woman who in 1949 managed to obtain ketchup and curry powder from British soldiers, mixed them up and served the result over grilled sausage, instantly creating a German street food classic.

Today boiled and fried sausages are used, and currywurst remains one of the most popular sausage-based street foods in Germany, especially in Berlin, Cologne and the Rhine-Ruhr, where it's usually served with chips and ketchup or mayonnaise or a bread roll.

Not the most sophisticated of dishes, but a filling street snack born out of necessity about which all of Germany is still mad: some 800 million are consumed a year.

6. Döner kebab

Döner kebab was introduced to Germany by Turkish immigrant workers coming here in the 1960s and '70s. One of the earliest street sellers was Kadir Nurman, who started offering döner kebab sandwiches at West Berlin's Zoo Station in 1972, from the where the dish first took both West and East Berlin by storm and then the rest of Germany.

From its humble Berlin beginnings when a döner kebab only contained meat, onions and a bit of salad, it developed into a dish with abundant salad, vegetables (sometimes grilled), and a selection of sauces from which to choose.

Veal and chicken spits are widely used as is the ever-popular lamb, while vegetarian and vegan versions are becoming increasingly common.

Related content

Which country has the best food?

7. Schnitzel

German? Austrian? Italian? Whatever the origins, schnitzel is wildly popular.

Helmut Meyer Zur Capellen/imageBROKER/Shutterstock

Some might argue that schnitzel is Austrian and not German, but its origins are actually Italian.

This controversy hasn't stopped the breaded and fried meat cutlets to become popular everywhere in Germany, however. While the Austrian or Vienna schnitzel is by law only made with veal, the German version is made with tenderized pork or turkey and has become a staple of most traditional restaurants.

Whereas Vienna schnitzel is served plain, Germans love to ladle a variety of sauces over their schnitzel. Jägerschnitzel comes with mushroom sauce, zigeunerschnitzel with bell pepper sauce and rahmschnitzel is served with a creamy sauce.

(Video) 10 Must-Eat German Food | The Ultimate Guide to German Food Travel

All go well with fried potatoes and cold lager or a Franconian apple wine.

8. Käsespätzle

Spätzle originally come from Baden-Württemberg. Essentially a sort of pasta, the noodles are a simple combination of eggs, flour, salt and often a splash of fizzy water to fluff up the dough. Traditionally served as a side to meat dishes or dropped into soups, it can be spiced up by adding cheese: the käsespätzle variant is an extremely popular dish in southern Germany, especially Swabia, Bavaria and the Allgäu region.

Hot spätzle and grated granular cheese are layered alternately and are finally decorated with fried onions. After adding each layer, the käsespätzle will be put into the oven to avoid cooling off and to ensure melting of cheese. Käsespätzle is a popular menu item in beer gardens in summer and cozy Munich pubs in winter.

9. Rouladen

Rouladen is a delicious blend of bacon, onions, mustard and pickles wrapped together in sliced beef or veal. Vegetarian and other meat options are also now widely available but the real deal is rinderrouladen (beef rouladen), a popular dish in western Germany and the Rhine region.

This is a staple of family dinners and special occasions. They are usually served with potato dumplings, mashed potatoes and pickled red cabbage. A red wine gravy is an absolute requirement to round off the dish.

Related content

Best Turkish foods: 23 delicious dishes

10. Sauerbraten

Sauerbraten is regarded as one Germany's national dishes and there are several regional variations in Franconia, Thuringia, Rhineland, Saarland, Silesia and Swabia.

This pot roast takes quite a while to prepare, but the results, often served as Sunday family dinner, are truly worth the work. Sauerbraten (literally "sour roast") is traditionally prepared with horse meat, but these days beef and venison are increasingly used.

Before cooking, the meat is marinated for several days in a mixture of red wine vinegar, herbs and spices. Drowned in a dark gravy made with beetroot sugar sauce and rye bread to balance the sour taste of the vinegar, sauerbraten is then traditionally served with red cabbage, potato dumplings or boiled potatoes.

11. Himmel un ääd

This is another messy and not necessarily optically appealing dish, but nevertheless definitely worth trying. Himmel und erde, or himmel un ääd in Cologne (both mean "Heaven and Earth") is popular in the Rhineland, Westphalia and Lower Saxony. The dish consists of black pudding, fried onions and mashed potatoes with apple sauce.

It has been around since the 18th century, and these days is a beloved staple of the many Kölsch breweries and beer halls in Cologne, where it goes perfectly well with a glass or three of the popular beer.

l

e

v

a

r

t

12. Zwiebelkuchen and federweisser

October is the month to taste the first wines of the year in Germany, and a well-known culinary treat in the south is federweisser und zwiebelkuchen (partially fermented young white wine and onion tart).

Federweisser literally means "feather white" and is made by adding yeast to grapes, allowing fermentation to proceed rapidly. Once the alcohol level reaches 4%, federweisser is sold. It is mostly enjoyed near where it is produced. Because of the fast fermentation, it needs to be consumed within a couple days of being bottled. In addition, the high levels of carbonation means that it cannot be bottled and transported in airtight containers.

(Video) List of traditional food from Germany - German Foods The World needs to try By Traditional Dishes

In most towns and cities along the Mosel River, people flock to marketplaces and wine gardens in early October to sip a glass of federweisser and feast crispy, freshly made onion tarts called zwiebelkuchen. Because of its light and sweet taste, it pairs well with the savory, warm onion cake.

13. Saumagen

World politics in a pig's stomach. Saumagen was made famous by German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, who (like the dish) hailed from the Palatinate. Kohl loved saumagen and served it to visiting dignitaries including Margaret Thatcher, Mikhail Gorbachev, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton.

The literal translation of this dish is "sow's stomach," but saumagen is a lot less curious than its name implies.

Somewhat resembling Scottish haggis, it is prepared by using the stomach of a pig (or an artificial one) as a casing for the stuffing made from pork, potatoes, carrots, onions, marjoram, nutmeg and white pepper.

It is then sliced and pan-fried or roasted in the oven, and, as Kohl knew, goes down perfectly well with sauerkraut, mashed potatoes and a dry white wine from the Palatinate.

Related content

Breakfast around the world: How different countries start the day

14. Pinkel mit grünkohl

Pinkel mit grünkohl, or cooked kale and sausage, is a delicious winter comfort food eaten mainly in northwest Germany, especially the region around Oldenburg, Bremen and Osnabrück as well as East Frisia and Friesland.

The cooked kale is mixed with mustard and bacon, and the "pinkel" sausage (named after the pinky) is made of bacon, groats of oats or barley, beef suet, pig lard, onions, and salt and pepper.

Germans sometimes celebrate winter with a traditional so-called "Grünkohlfahrt," where family and friends go on a brisk hike accompanied by schnapps and finished off with a warm kale dinner in a country inn.

15. Spargel

Germans are mad about white asparagus. As soon as harvest time arrives around mid-April, asparagus dishes appear on the menus of restaurants all over Germany, from Flensburg to Munich and Aachen to Frankfurt.

This is spargelzeit, the time of the asparagus, and it is celebrated with passion. During spargelzeit, the average German eats asparagus at least once a day. This adds up to a national total of over 70,000 tons of asparagus consumed per year.

No one can truly say where this fixation with white asparagus comes from, but the first document that mentions the cultivation of this vegetable around the city of Stuttgart dates to the 1686. There are spargel festivals, a spargel route in Baden-Württemberg and countless stalls along the roads of Germany selling the "white gold."

In restaurants, asparagus is boiled or steamed and served with hollandaise sauce, melted butter or olive oil. It comes wrapped in bacon or heaped upon schnitzel; as asparagus soup, fried asparagus, pancakes with herbs and asparagus, asparagus with scrambled eggs or asparagus with young potatoes. There is an audible sigh all over Germany when spargelzeit ends on June 24, St. John the Baptist Day.

16. Reibekuchen

Fried potato pancakes are so popular in Germany that we have more than 40 names for them. They are known as reibekuchen, kartoffelpuffer, reibeplätzchen, reiberdatschi, grumbeerpannekuche and so on and so on.

Another quintessential German comfort and street food, reibekuchen are often served with apple sauce, on black pumpernickel rye bread or with treacle (a type of syrup).

They're popular all year around: in Cologne and the Rhineland they are beloved of revelers during the Karneval festivities in spring, and all German Christmas markets have reibekuchen vendors where hundreds of litres of potato dough are being processed every day during the holiday season.

l

e

v

a

(Video) Incredible Top 10 Most Popular Germany Foods || Traditional Germany Foods || Germany Street Foods

r

t

17. Rollmops

Rollmöpse (plural) are cooked or fried and then pickled herring fillets, rolled around a savory filling like a pickled gherkin or green olive with pimento, and have been served on the coasts since medieval times.

Becoming popular during the early 19th century when the long-range train network allowed pickled food to be transported, Rollmöpse have been a staple snack on German tables ever since.

Rollmöpse are usually bought ready-to-eat in jars and are eaten straight, without unrolling, or on bread and sometimes with labskaus (see above). And like labskaus, they are commonly served as part of the German katerfrühstück or hangover breakfast.

Related content

Nudity in Germany: Here's the naked truth

18. Schwarzwälder kirschtorte

Germany has a vast variety of cakes, but among the most popular is the Schwarzwälder kirschtorte or Black Forest gateau.

The cake is not named after the Black Forest mountain range in southwestern Germany, but the speciality liquor of that region, Schwarzwälder kirsch, distilled from tart cherries.

Allegedly created by Josef Keller in 1915 at Café Agner in Bonn in the Rhineland, it typically consists of several layers of chocolate sponge cake sandwiched with whipped cream and sour cherries, and then drizzled with kirschwasser. It is decorated with additional whipped cream, maraschino cherries and chocolate shavings.

Its popularity in Germany grew quickly and steadily after World War II, and it's during this period that the kirschtorte starts appearing in other countries too, particularly on the British Isles.

Whatever the reason for its success, it is both perfect for kaffee und kuchen in a German cafe on a Sunday afternoon as well as dessert.

19. Käsekuchen

There are rarely any strawberries in German cheesecake (or any other fruits for that matter), and the base is surely not made from crackers but freshly made dough (or even without base, like in the East Prussian version).

The filling is made with low-fat quark instead of cream cheese and egg foam is added to give it more fluff, plus lemon and vanilla for some extra freshness.

Maybe this purity and the focus on a handful of ingredients is why a version of cheesecake exits in almost every region of Germany: there's käsekuchen, quarkkuchen, matzkuchen and even topfenkuchen in Austria.

Wherever you try it, you can be sure that it is the perfect treat with some added fresh cream and a hot cup of coffee.

Related content

50 of the world's best desserts

20. Spaghettieis

This dessert is another immigrant legacy and is popular with German children.

Spaghettieis is an ice cream dish made to look like a plate of spaghetti. Vanilla ice cream is pressed through a modified noodle press or potato ricer, giving it the appearance of spaghetti. It is then placed over whipped cream and topped with strawberry sauce representing the tomato sauce and white chocolate shavings for the parmesan.

Besides the usual dish with strawberry sauce, there are also variations with dark chocolate ice cream and nuts available, resembling spaghetti carbonara instead of spaghetti bolognese.

Spaghetti ice cream was invented in 1969 by Dario Fontanella, son of an ice cream-making Italian immigrant in Mannheim, Germany. Thankfully for us and perhaps unfortunately for Dario, he didn't patent his spaghetti ice cream and it is today available at almost every ice cream parlor anywhere in Germany.

(Video) German Food & What You Should Eat in Germany

Dario did, however, receive the "Bloomaulorden," a medal bestowed by the city of Mannheim, for his culinary services in 2014.

This article was first published in October 2019 and updated and republished in October 2021.

FAQs

What is the number 1 food in Germany? ›

1. Spätzle – Traditional Swabian Egg Noodles. It might come as a surprise, but the most famous German food, Spätzle, is completely vegetarian. Spätzle are a kind of pasta, but the dough only consists of eggs, flour, salt and a hint of sparkling water (in order to fluff up the dough).

What's Germany's national dish? ›

A popular German dish is Sauerbraten which is considered one of the country's national dishes. It is essentially a German pot roast and is made with beef, veal, or venison as the main meat.

What is a German breakfast? ›

A German breakfast consists of hearty Brot (breads) and Brötchen (rolls), decorated with butter, sweet jams and local honey, thinly sliced meats, cheese and even some Leberwurst.

What do Germans eat for dinner? ›

Dinner or Evening Meal (Abendbrot)

Literally translated it means “evening bread” and is a light cold meal with breads and cold cuts, usually eaten between 6 and 7 pm. This is because German families tend to eat their main meal during lunch.

What is German famous for? ›

With an interesting and rich history narrated by the old-fashion and colorful architecture, castles, palaces, cathedrals and monuments themselves, its landscapes, mountains and forests, delicious food and beer, Germany remains one of the top destinations in the world for travelers.

What do Germans call Germany? ›

Not to be forgotten, the exonym Germans use is Deutschland. Just like with words, names evolve over time. Germany, for example, was called Germany by its inhabitants long before the country was united and began to call itself Deutschland.

Is German food healthy? ›

Traditional German cuisine is known for healthy, hearty dishes served with most care. In fact, many of the American foods are originated from the traditional recipes of German food. Moreover, traditional German foods are influenced greatly by their local regional delicacies.

What do they drink in Germany? ›

Germans are big fans of all types of juices (Säfte). The most popular juices are Orangensaft (Orange), Apfelsaft (Apple), Traubensaft (Grape) and Multivitaminsaft (Multivitamin juice).

What makes German food unique? ›

German cuisine often has been labeled as stodgy and fatty, which can be attributed to the lack of variety in the rural German countryside until the last 200 years. Germany has benefited from a close association with Italy and France and adopted many of their spices and cooking methods, always with a German twist.

What are 5 interesting facts about Germany? ›

Interesting facts about Germany
  • 65% of the highways in Germany have no speed limit and are called the Autobahn.
  • Germany sells around 6 million cars a year, making it one of the largest car producers in the world.
  • The first book ever printed was in German, and the first magazine was launched in Germany in 1663.
20 Aug 2021

Is German food spicy? ›

With the exception of mustard for sausages, German dishes are rarely hot and spicy; the most popular herbs and spices are traditionally parsley, thyme, laurel, chives, black pepper (used in small amounts), juniper berries, nutmeg, and caraway.

What is Germany's national animal? ›

The federal coat of arms depicts the single-headed black eagle against a golden background; it has its head turned to the right and wings open, with the feathers not spread; its beak, tongue and talons are red. The eagle is the emblem of the Federal Republic of Germany.

What alcohol is Germany famous? ›

1- Jägermeister

Jägermeister is undoubtedly Germany's most popular alcoholic beverage after beer. What is this? This herbal liqueur is as complex as it is delicious, comprising 56 different herbs that many believe give Jägermeister medicinal properties. This digestif was created in 1934.

What beer is German? ›

Schwarzbier (“black beer”) is a 4 to 6 percent alcohol lager made from dark-roasted malt, and one of Germany's best-known schwarzbiers is Kostritzer. Produced in a brewery that's been in operation since 1543, Kostritzer offers a roasty, nutty nose and flavors of pumpernickel and bitter chocolate.

Do Germans eat a lot of sausage? ›

Germans' love of sausage is legendary. Per capita consumption averages some 30 kilos a year.

What is cake called in Germany? ›

Kuchen is the German word for cake, and is used in other languages as the name for several different types of sweet desserts, pastries, and gateaux. Often sold at Christmas fairs and Carnival.

What cakes do Germans eat? ›

Guide to German Cookies and Cakes
  • Bee Sting Cake (Bienenstich) ...
  • Black Forest Cake (Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte) ...
  • Butter Cake/ Sugar Cake (Butterkuchen/ Zuckerkuchen) ...
  • Cheese Cake (Käsekuchen) ...
  • Donut (Krapfen / Berliner) ...
  • Frankfurt Wreath (Frankfurter Kranz) ...
  • Gingerbread (Lebkuchen) ...
  • Gugelhupf (Gugelhupf)

What is the most popular sweet in Germany? ›

Most popular brands of sweets in Germany 2020

In 2020, the most popular brand of sweets was Haribo, whereas the least popular brand of sweets was Pez.

What is bread called in Germany? ›

"Brötchen" ("Brot" is German for bread, the -"chen" is a diminutive suffix) are a staple all over the German-speaking world, but the word used to order the crusty rolls at the bakery counter vary greatly.

What do Germans put on their toast? ›

The German bread and butter for breakfast is... well, bread and butter! Lightly toasted or freshly sliced, you add a generous spread of butter or margarine and then pick your topping. As a topping, Germans like it sweet, like jams, marmelade, Nutella or honey.

What time do Germans have dinner? ›

First of all, there is something that might confuse foreigners about German eating habits. The typical meals are divided in a rather copious breakfast (6 am – 8 am), lunch (12 pm – 2 pm) and dinner (6 pm – 8 pm).

What do German ladies wear? ›

A dirndl is the name of a woman's dress traditionally worn in southern Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein, Switzerland, and Alpine regions of Italy. The dirndl is a folk costume (in German – Tracht), and today is generally regarded as a traditional dress for women and girls in the Alps.

How many times a day do Germans eat? ›

Traditionally Germans have three main meals, breakfast, lunch, and dinner. On holidays, afternoon tea is served at many homes.

How do Germans eat eggs? ›

Germans love to eat soft boiled eggs with breakfast, and cook eggs in electric egg cookers. Egg cookers require very little effort. They put them in cute little egg cups and eat them with small egg spoons. My kids think soft boiled eggs are gross, but I like them, probably because I grew up eating them in Germany.

What is Germany's real name? ›

The official name of the country is Federal Republic of Germany (Bundesrepublik Deutschland).

What's good about Germany? ›

10 simple reasons why living in Germany is truly awesome
  • Nine different borders. ...
  • Low cost of living. ...
  • Brilliant beer. ...
  • Stunning scenery. ...
  • Luxury train system. ...
  • Enchanting Christmas markets. ...
  • Lots of public holidays. ...
  • Ease of getting a job.
8 Jun 2017

What was Germany's old name? ›

Before it was called Germany, it was called Germania. In the years A.D. 900 – 1806, Germany was part of the Holy Roman Empire. From 1949 to 1990, Germany was made up of two countries called the Federal Republic of Germany (inf. West Germany) and the German Democratic Republic (inf.

Why is Germany so rich? ›

The German economy has its great innovativeness and strong focus on exports to thank for its competitiveness and global networking. In high-selling sectors, such as car-making, mechanical and plant engineering, the chemicals industry and medical technology, exports account for well over half of total sales.

What is a nickname for Germany? ›

Deutschland, Allemagne, Tyskland, Saksa, Németország: All over the world, the federal republic that is Germany is known by different names.

How do Germans stay so thin? ›

The real reason Germans are some of the thinnest and fittest people in the world is that they walk a lot in their day-to-day lives. Yes, it's really that simple – while some 80% of Americans have a car, in Germany, the figure is closer to 50%.

Do Germans eat fast food? ›

McDonald's is currently the most popular fast food restaurant in Germany. The first ever in the country opened in Munich in 1971. Germany actually had the second most McDonald's restaurants in Europe as of 2020, following France.

Why do Germans love potatoes? ›

According to legend, King Frederick II of Prussia believed in the economic and nutritious value of potatoes. He tricked local farmers into planting more of the so-called apple of the earth by posting soldiers around the potato fields to protect them. It worked — highly valued goods taste even better.

What do Germans do for fun? ›

TV tops Germany's most popular leisure activities. What do Germans do in their free time? Mostly, they watch TV, listen to the radio, and surf the internet, a new study says. They're also spending less and less time reading books and hanging out with friends and family.

What do Germans drink after dinner? ›

Germany is a beer-drinking country, but when it comes to an after-dinner drink, Germans reach for liquor and liqueurs. Eau de vies (spirits made from fruit) are common, as are bittersweet liqueurs.

What is German coffee? ›

A German Coffee

A “German coffee” is a type of cocktail made with Kirschwasser, coffee and whipped cream. That's definitely not what we're talking about here! Germans generally like milder flavors. They really aren't into spicy or pungent.

What is the most popular condiment in Germany? ›

Most popular seasoning products in Germany in 2021

In 2021, mustard was the most popular seasoning in Germany, followed by dry spices and herbs, then ketchup.

What is the most popular vegetable in Germany? ›

The tomato is the most beloved vegetable in Germany. The average German eats about 57 pounds of them each year. Nevertheless, the tomato is still wrongly used as an ingredient in many drinks, where it loses its flavour.

What vegetables do Germans eat? ›

Among the favorites in German cooking are potatoes, various types of cabbage, carrots, spinach, peas, asparagus, beans, tomatoes, cucumbers, and various types of salads. Onions are mainly served with meat dishes or as ingredients in many recipes. Sauerkraut is also a favorite throughout Germany.

What does the longest word in German mean? ›

So the longest word to be found in the German dictionary is Kraftfahrzeughaftpflichtversicherung – "motor vehicle indemnity insurance".

What is unique about German language? ›

German has a unique letter

German uses the Latin alphabet. It has, however, an additional consonant: the ß, called "Eszett". The letter never stands at the beginning of the word and, following a long vowel or diphtong, takes the form of a double-s.

What are 2 history facts about Germany? ›

Germany is one of the world's leading book nations. Publishing around 94,000 titles every year. The first magazine ever seen was launched in 1663 in Germany. Germany was the first country in the world to adopt Daylight saving time – DST, also known as summer time.

What do German people eat for breakfast? ›

Answer: Breakfast in Germany is usually with bread rolls or slices of whole wheat or rye bread with any kind of jam or marmalade, nougat cream or with salami, ham or cheese slices. This food is accompanied mostly with a cup of coffee and orange juice.

What is Germany's favorite drink? ›

Most purchased and consumed beverages in Germany 2019-2021. Mineral water is by far the most purchased and consumed beverage in Germany. Over 86 percent of the population bought it in 2021. Germans are known for their preference of fizzy drinking water.

What is Germany famous for? ›

With an interesting and rich history narrated by the old-fashion and colorful architecture, castles, palaces, cathedrals and monuments themselves, its landscapes, mountains and forests, delicious food and beer, Germany remains one of the top destinations in the world for travelers.

What do German people drink? ›

The most notable kräuterlikör brands include Jägermeister, Underberg, Becherovka, Unicum, Riga Black Balsam, Killepitsch, Kuemmerling, and Aromatique. Although all varieties can be incorporated into cocktails and long drinks, they are traditionally enjoyed well-chilled and neat, preferably as a digestif.

What time do Germans have dinner? ›

First of all, there is something that might confuse foreigners about German eating habits. The typical meals are divided in a rather copious breakfast (6 am – 8 am), lunch (12 pm – 2 pm) and dinner (6 pm – 8 pm).

Why are Germans so healthy? ›

Germany. All the usual culprits are here: nationalized healthcare, high tax rates, fresh, whole foods. So it's no surprise that Germany ranks among the world's healthiest countries. But Germany also has incredibly clean air, promoting a very active, outdoorsy culture that relishes walking and bike riding.

What is cake called in Germany? ›

Kuchen is the German word for cake, and is used in other languages as the name for several different types of sweet desserts, pastries, and gateaux. Often sold at Christmas fairs and Carnival.

What cakes do Germans eat? ›

Guide to German Cookies and Cakes
  • Bee Sting Cake (Bienenstich) ...
  • Black Forest Cake (Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte) ...
  • Butter Cake/ Sugar Cake (Butterkuchen/ Zuckerkuchen) ...
  • Cheese Cake (Käsekuchen) ...
  • Donut (Krapfen / Berliner) ...
  • Frankfurt Wreath (Frankfurter Kranz) ...
  • Gingerbread (Lebkuchen) ...
  • Gugelhupf (Gugelhupf)

What is the most popular sweet in Germany? ›

Most popular brands of sweets in Germany 2020

In 2020, the most popular brand of sweets was Haribo, whereas the least popular brand of sweets was Pez.

What do Germans do for fun? ›

TV tops Germany's most popular leisure activities. What do Germans do in their free time? Mostly, they watch TV, listen to the radio, and surf the internet, a new study says. They're also spending less and less time reading books and hanging out with friends and family.

What do Germans drink on Christmas? ›

Glühwein is traditionally served at stalls at Christmas markets across Germany and Austria to keep people warm as they shop and socialize. Here is a basic recipe that will make Glühwein like you would get at a German Christmas market.

Can you drink at 14 in Germany? ›

Belgium, Denmark and Germany set 16 years as the minimum age for purchasing beverages containing less than 1.2 % of distilled alcohol and 18 years for buying spirits (more than 1.2 % of distilled alcohol). Sweden set the minimum age for purchasing beverages with more than 3.5 % of alcohol at 20 years.

What is Germany's real name? ›

The official name of the country is Federal Republic of Germany (Bundesrepublik Deutschland).

What are 5 facts about Germany? ›

Fun and Interesting Facts About Germany
  • Germany Has 1,000 Varieties of Sausages!
  • The Most Popular German Surname is Müller.
  • Beer is a Food in Bavaria.
  • Germany Loves Bread.
  • Gummy Bears are a German Invention.
  • The First Oktoberfest Was a Wedding.
  • JFK Was Not a Jelly Donut.
  • Germany Has the World's Largest Cathedral.
17 Feb 2022

What is Germany's national animal? ›

The federal coat of arms depicts the single-headed black eagle against a golden background; it has its head turned to the right and wings open, with the feathers not spread; its beak, tongue and talons are red. The eagle is the emblem of the Federal Republic of Germany.

Videos

1. 20 Weird Things in GERMAN SUPERMARKETS!
(Deana and Phil)
2. Amazing Munich Food Tour - German CRISPY PORK LEG and Attractions in Munich, Germany!
(Mark Wiens)
3. GERMAN FOOD TOUR - KÖLN, Germany (Rhineland Meat and Bakery Specialties)
(Deana and Phil)
4. German Potato Dishes - Potatoes in Germany: 20 Ways of Serving Potatoes in Germany
(Cooking the World)
5. Top 20 Most Famous and best unbelievable Breathtaking Top 20 Most Good Foods in Germany
(Animals Lucki Family)
6. Northern German Food - North German Cuisine - What to eat in Northern Germany?
(Cooking the World)

Top Articles

You might also like

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Allyn Kozey

Last Updated: 08/19/2022

Views: 5849

Rating: 4.2 / 5 (63 voted)

Reviews: 86% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Allyn Kozey

Birthday: 1993-12-21

Address: Suite 454 40343 Larson Union, Port Melia, TX 16164

Phone: +2456904400762

Job: Investor Administrator

Hobby: Sketching, Puzzles, Pet, Mountaineering, Skydiving, Dowsing, Sports

Introduction: My name is Allyn Kozey, I am a outstanding, colorful, adventurous, encouraging, zealous, tender, helpful person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.